Graph Laplacian Diffusion Localization of Connected and Automated Vehicles

AI-generated keywords: Connected and Automated Vehicles Localization Adapt-then-Combine Strategies Least-Mean-Squares Conjugate Gradient

AI-generated Key Points

  • Authors propose distributed multi-modal localization approaches for CAVs using information diffusion on graphs formed by moving vehicles
  • Methods are based on Adapt-then-Combine strategies combined with LMS and CG algorithms
  • Vehicular network treated as undirected graph, vehicles communicate using Vehicle-to-Vehicle communication protocols
  • Goal is to enable CAVs to perform cooperative fusion of different measurement modalities for position estimation without relying on centralized node or GPS
  • Trajectories generated using kinematic model or CARLA autonomous driving simulator for evaluation
  • Proposed methods significantly reduce GPS error and outperform traditional LMS method
  • Convergence properties compared between LMS and CG with measurements exchanges, CG fails in presence of network delay and increased range measurements noise
  • Impact of VANET size, number of vehicle connections, network delay, and range measurements uncertainty investigated
  • LMS with measurements exchanges identified as most efficient method under these conditions
  • Paper presents novel distributed multi-modal localization approaches superior to existing state-of-the-art methods in terms of accuracy and convergence properties
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Authors: Nikos Piperigkos, Aris S. Lalos, Kostas Berberidis

License: CC BY 4.0

Abstract: In this paper, we design distributed multi-modal localization approaches for Connected and Automated vehicles. We utilize information diffusion on graphs formed by moving vehicles, based on Adapt-then-Combine strategies combined with the Least-Mean-Squares and the Conjugate Gradient algorithms. We treat the vehicular network as an undirected graph, where vehicles communicate with each other by means of Vehicle-to- Vehicle communication protocols. Connected vehicles perform cooperative fusion of different measurement modalities, including location and range measurements, in order to estimate both their positions and the positions of all other networked vehicles, by interacting only with their local neighborhood. The trajectories of vehicles were generated either by a well-known kinematic model, or by using the CARLA autonomous driving simulator. The various proposed distributed and diffusion localization schemes significantly reduce the GPS error and do not only converge to the global solution, but they even outperformed it. Extensive simulation studies highlight the benefits of the various approaches, outperforming the accuracy of the state of the art approaches. The impact of the network connections and the network latency are also investigated.

Submitted to arXiv on 24 Aug. 2021

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Results of the summarizing process for the arXiv paper: 2108.10678v1

In this paper, the authors propose distributed multi-modal localization approaches for Connected and Automated Vehicles (CAVs) by utilizing information diffusion on graphs formed by moving vehicles. The methods are based on Adapt-then-Combine strategies combined with the Least-Mean-Squares (LMS) and the Conjugate Gradient (CG) algorithms. The vehicular network is treated as an undirected graph, where vehicles communicate with each other using Vehicle-to-Vehicle communication protocols. The goal of the proposed approaches is to enable CAVs to perform cooperative fusion of different measurement modalities, including location and range measurements, in order to estimate their own positions as well as the positions of all other networked vehicles. This estimation is achieved without relying on a centralized node or GPS but instead interacting only with their local neighborhood. To evaluate the performance of the proposed methods, trajectories of vehicles were generated either by a well-known kinematic model or by using the CARLA autonomous driving simulator. Extensive simulation studies were conducted to compare the accuracy and convergence properties of various approaches with state-of-the art methods. The results show that the proposed distributed and diffusion localization schemes significantly reduce GPS error and outperform traditional LMS method. They not only converge to the global solution but also exhibit increased robustness in presence of range measurements uncertainty. Furthermore, comparison between LMS and CG with measurements exchanges reveals similar convergence properties whereas CG fails to operate adequately in presence of network delay and increased range measurements noise. The impact of VANET size, number of vehicle connections, network delay and range measurements uncertainty on performance was investigated as well. The findings highlight that LMS with measurements exchanges is most efficient method under these conditions. Overall, this paper presents novel distributed multi-modal localization approaches for CAVs based on information diffusion on graphs formed by moving vehicles. The extensive simulation studies demonstrate their superiority over existing state-of-the art methods in terms of accuracy and convergence properties while providing valuable insights for design and implementation of localization strategies in connected and automated vehicle systems.
Created on 16 Aug. 2023

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